Education Units

 

EARTH SCIENCES:

Student conducting water testing at the TREE Center on Bauneg Beg LakeWater Lessons
From Lots to Lakes
Incredible Journey
Water Quality
What is a Watershed?
What’s in the Mud?

Geology/Soil
Does it Drain?
Paste with a Taste

Atmosphere
Our Changing Climate
Weather Ways

 

LIFE SCIENCES:

Flora/Fauna
Building a Forest
Fallen LogTREE Center Environmental Education Trail Camera
Producer, Consumer, Decomposer
Tree identification

Ecology
Biodiversity
Forest Biomes
Habitat is a Home
Trees as Habitats
Wetland Investigations
Winter Ecology

 

From Lots to Lakes
Students will engage in activities that define the term runoff, point and non-point source pollution, and classify pollution as non-point or point source. Students will understand how a landscape can increase or decrease water runoff and the impact it has on the local water sources.

Incredible Journey
Students will experience hands-on activities that will increase their geographic and environmental knowledge of the Earth’s water resources. Students will make a water cycle model, explain the importance of water, and identify the state of water as it moves through the water cycle. *Adapted activity from Project WET*

Water Quality
Students will discuss the four basic water quality parameters (pH, turbidity, temperature, dissolved oxygen). Participants will learn sampling procedures and technology used to test each of these parameters and their impact on the local watershed.

What is a Watershed?
This topic will allow students to define the term watershed, understand influences humans have on a watershed, predict where water flows within a watershed, and to observe drainage patterns in a watershed.

What’s in the Mud?
In this topic, students will determine water quality using “bioindicators” such as microfauna found along a freshwater source. Students will conduct a field investigation and be able to reach a conclusion based on empirically supported evidence.

Does it Drain?
This topic allows students to see how different types of soil are composed and how this affects the way water moves through the various sediments. The students will also understand how humans use the various soils to change their surrounding landscape. *Adapted activity from Project Learning Tree *

Paste with a Taste
This topic allows students to produce a “marketable” product made from minerals that are used by most people every day. This lesson focuses on two naturally found minerals found in toothpaste, calcium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate. *Adapted activity from Women in Mining Education Foundation*

Our Changing Climate
This series of lessons will allow the students to understand the basics of the greenhouse effect and how humans may impact global temperature change.  Students will also learn how new technology is allowing humans to improve energy use and lessen human effects.

Weather Ways
This topic allows students to understand the function of the atmosphere and the difference between weather and climate.  Students will also be able to understand weather patterns and how they affect biotic factors.

Building a Forest
This topic focuses on the various layers and levels that are present in a forest ecosystem.  Students will go over the plants and trees found in each layer and how these layers impact forest habitats.

Fallen Log
Students will identify some of the organisms that live in, on, or under fallen logs and explain how these organisms depend on the dead wood for survival.  Students will also be able to describe the process of decomposition and discuss how nature recycles nutrients.

Producer, Consumer, Decomposer
Students will learn about specific food webs within any given ecosystem. They will be able to identify the animals and plants that are decomposers, consumers, and producers. This lesson will also focus on the movement of energy within those food webs.

Tree Identification
Students will be introduced to characteristics of trees and how to identify the species based on these characteristics. Students will also go over the economical impact of different trees and the importance of identifying them.

Biodiversity
Students will be able to see the correlation between the biodiversity within a habitat and the health of that habitat. Students will also learn how biodiversity is measured and how biodiversity is in danger around the world’s ecosystems.

Forest Biomes
This topic allows students to identify characteristics found in each of Earth’s biomes and lets them distinguish between specific forest biomes. The students will take part in a field investigation to determine which biome they inhabit.survival.  Students will also be able to describe the process of decomposition and discuss how nature recycles nutrients.

Habitat is a Home
This topic introduces students to the components of a habitat (food, water, space and shelter) and the limiting factors that influence the carrying capacity of populations within a habitat.

Trees as Habitats
This topic allows students to portray and discuss the interrelationships between trees and the animals that inhabit them.  Students will also focus on the abiotic characteristics that are available in the forest habitat.

Wetland Investigations
Students will be able to investigate our freshwater wetland ecosystem. Students will be able to identify the biotic and abiotic characteristics that make up a wetland and learn about the effect human influences have on a wetland.

Winter Ecology
Students will gain an understanding of how animals and plants adapt to a winter season and how weather affects the landscape and geological makeup of local areas.  This lesson usually includes a short snowshoe outing.